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The new job is taking up a lot more of my time and energy than I initially anticipated. I’m not sure if it’s because it is more challenging or because I am pushing myself more than usual in an attempt to make up for my lack of experience (as well as my lack of seniority). It’s quite the contrast from my last job where, by the time I left in February, I had been on board for longer than every other officer save one, and was senior to half of them.

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Is there a tastier snack than the Cadbury Creme Egg? I ask this in all seriousness. I am completely addicted to those little buggers. In the past week, I have eaten no less than a baker’s dozen of them, and they were not bought in bulk (yes, I’ve made that many trips to Wal-Mart). They may be the perfect dessert- or breakfast, if you’re incredibly luck- and I can see no way in which they can be improved.

A bit melty? Well that’s ok, then it almost has the consistency of a real egg. Plus, you’ll inevitably get some chocolaty creamy deliciousness on your fingers which makes for good licking well after the initial egg has been devoured. It’s the gift that keeps on giving.

A bit frozen? This happens to be my personal fave. I think it improves the texture somewhat and, more importanly, makes the egg last a bit longer. For me, making those puppies last is an exercise in restraint; having the eggs semi-frozen makes it much easier. Think bumper bowling…

And in book related news, I’m currently reading The Omnivore’s Dilemma (both excellent and intriguing), as well as The Egyptologist (not very far, but is very interesting thus far).
If I finish those books and another by Monday, I will make up some ground; however, I still have a ways to go if I have any shot of getting to 150…

At the moment, I fear I am a bit behind schedule on the reading goal.  Initially,  I thought the move to Texas was going to be beneficial in that respect, but I’m not getting as much reading down as I thought.  I’d love to say it’s because I’m busting my ass trying to learn the new job so I set myself up for future success; however, I have a feeling it has more to do with the digital cable subscription that I suddenly have access to.  It’s too bad that I’ve already read The Shawshank Redemption and The Stand, otherwise I could create a new “Books on Video” category and take some credit.  Unfortunately, I think that’s cheating…

In other news, I read Le Petit Prince yesterday and loved every single illustrated page of it (them picture books make for easy reading).  I’m not sure how many people outside of high school French students have actually read this book, but I wholeheartedly recommend it.

Why, the Tao of this guy (of course):

winnie20the20pooh1

As the title suggests, this little book by Benjamin Hoff is an introduction to Taoism which uses Winnie-the-Pooh and other friends from Hundred Acre Wood to introduce basic Eastern philosophical  principles.  In a nutshell (or perhaps a honeypot???) Pooh epitomizes the “uncarved block”, as he is fully in tune with himself, though he is often said to have little Brain.   Pooh seems positively enlightened next to the worrisome Eeyore, the “tries to hard” Owl, the busy Rabbit, and the hesitant Piglet.

I enjoyed the book- mostly because of the short, digestible description of Taoism.  Blashphemous as it may sound, I didn’t find the use of the Winni-the-Pooh characters as life altering and mind blowing as some seem to.  I thought it was original, and fairly effective, but the proverbs/maxims that Hoff lifts from the various Taoist texts were just as (if not more) enlightening as the examples he pulled from  Winnie-the-Pooh.   Still, I’d definitely recommend this to anyone who has an interest in learning something about Taoism, or perhaps someone who would just like to take a break and try looking at the world from a different perspective.  Remember,

While Eeyore frets…and Piglet hesitates…and Rabbit calculates…and Owl pontificates….Pooh just is.  And that’s the clue to the secret wisdom of the Taoists.